Practical EA may be key to its relevance

Most Architects and probably most IT people understand the benefits of a well-functioning Enterprise Architecture capability. Can we say the Business understands it too?

Developing and sustaining EA capability in context of a large enterprise can be very challenging. It is so because organizations usually start with the lot of baggage that has accumulated over the years. The baggage being the organizational silos, technical debt or company culture to name a few. For that reason it is very important to have a clearly articulated value proposition for EA. The value proposition must resonate with the Business and offer some short-term benefits in addition to long-term┬ábenefits. Having articulated the value, it is important to focus on delivering on those short-term promises because the failure to do so may undermine EA’s ability to realize the long-term ones. What does it mean exactly, you ask? It means that you may have to take a practical approach to Enterprise Architecture as opposed to a holistic one. It may mean the following:

  • Using architecture frameworks as guides and not as exact blueprints for EA.
  • Maximizing the reuse of existing processes in your organization, however imperfect they may be.
  • Relying on simple and familiar tools instead of pursuing the holy grail of a tool that promises to solve all EA problems.
  • Limiting the amount of architectural information to the level that can be reliably managed while still providing tangible value.
  • Establishing controls to ensure that architectural information maintains its currency over time.

Of course, the list can go on. The bottom line is that in order to run you have to learn how to walk first. Business may never let EA “run” if they can’t see that it can walk straight.

Join me at #SATURN14 for a brief talk about a practical approach to integrating Enterprise Architecture.

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